6 Good Things Your Messy House Says About You

When I was a young adult – when my kids were little, before they’d started taking over to the point that I just couldn’t keep up – I was a cleaning fanatic. Nothing could be out of place. I’d run around 24/7 vacuuming this, sweeping and wiping that. Then one afternoon, my friend Paula said to me, “When I die, I don’t want anyone to say that I ‘kept a good house’.”

Her words really hit home. I realized then that I’d been spending a whole lot of time trying to make my world perfect, like who really gives a crap? That day, I changed. (OK, I still vacuum quite frequently.)

Seriously, as long as I’m not as bad as those hoarder people, what difference does it make? I have better things to do.

Et voilà, this list was born…

sixgoodthings

And yes, I CAN rationalize anything.

Now leave that dust behind your bathroom door alone. It’s not hurting anybody. Go and dance around your living room for an hour or two. Here, let me help you…

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Author: Amanda Fox

I have three slightly neurotic grown children, three very active and extremely cute cats, and one crazy busy husband. I've been married for more than twenty-five years. I love fitness, fashion, dancing, interior design and architecture, music, and movies.

18 thoughts on “6 Good Things Your Messy House Says About You”

  1. I LOVE your list. It’s perfect.

    And, “Jesse’s Girl” is one of those songs that constantly pop into my head. Constantly. I am working on a post about suffering from this particular affliction. LOL!

  2. So dust behind the doors is ok, what about balled up cat hair on the steps? And in the corners? And occasionally on the table? Darn cats go everywhere! Oh, and thanks for the song. It will be stuck in my head all damn day. Excedrin won’t help that… LOL

  3. You are probably going to be “Jessie’s girl” for a while if you are anything like me. I’ve played that song – no lie – about ten times today LOL.

  4. It has been a bit of a life-long process, the attempt to honor the good things given to me by my mother, and to shed those which will not feed and sustain me and those around me. She could not relinquish control, and so walked the borderline of hoarding mentality. Striking a balance in order to become a more empowered woman has shaped much of my journey. Relationship with stuff, with clean, with imperfection—big.

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